INVEST IN COLOMBIAN EMERALDS                           

GLF Venture Inc.

Back to Emerald Branch

Our Associate, located in Bogotá Colombia and Miami, is a wholesaler company comprised of third generation experts in the emerald business.  They have been in operations since 1963. They supply major companies in the United States, Japan, India, Switzerland, and Spain with the world's finest emeralds. They understand the emerald business from mining to cutting and to setting the stones.  They always maintain the highest standards when selecting each Emerald.


Emeralds ranging from size 0.1 ct to 300 ct or more in rough and cut form. Calibrated sizes, cabochons, or fancy cuts.

 

You can obtain the quantity of emeralds that you want in Colombia, The United States or Canada at distributor prices. The only additional costs are delivery, the cost of appraisal and taxes charged.  

We speak Spanish, English and Italian

 

                                                                            We use Fed Express


 

Colombia is the worlds  major producer of emeralds.  Colombia produces 60% of the worlds emeralds (9 millions of carats, 1998), then Zambia at 15% and Brazil at 12%.  Colombia produces the worlds top stones in terms of clarity, color and bigger sizes.

 


Picture: “Green all over the world” Muzo Mine by Rob Gould, 2003

 

Loose Stones

The world's finest emeralds originate from the Chivor and Muzo Mines in Colombia, South America. The Spanish Conquistadors, who learned of their locations from the Indians, opened both mines in the 1500s. The fantastic emeralds emerging from these mines are referred to as "Old Mine Emeralds," and were mostly in the form of rounded pebbles called "Chibcha stones."

The Muzo emeralds exhibit fantastic yellowish-green shades, while the Chivor emeralds are distinguished worldwide by their deep bluish-green tones.

 

HISTORY
In antiquity, emeralds were thought to enable its wearer to predict events. Emeralds are believed to increase intelligence, protect marriages, and ease childbirth. They were cherished by the ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans, intricately cut and carved by pre-Columbian Mexicans and Peruvians, and today remains a treasured stone.

The emerald (Greek: smaragdos) of the ancients probably referred to a number of distinct species of green stones; that mentioned in the Old Testament probably was carbuncle garnet. Superstitions abound concerning the emerald, birthstone for May: it supposedly soothes the eyes, preserves chastity, cures dysentery, prevents epilepsy, and drives away evil spirits.


Writing about 2,000 years ago, Plini in his "Historia Naturalis" said: "No stone is more delightful to the eye than the emerald. The sight fixes itself with avidity upon the color of green grass and the foliage of the trees, but we have far more pleasure in looking upon the emerald for there is nothing in the world that is more satisfying."

Gemstones are also very portable. In Europe, for example, where wars have ravaged nations for centuries people have often been stripped of their land, their homes, and all their property and possessions including their bank accounts. How did many of these people manage to escape such persecution and enter another country and almost overnight be back in business. There is only one answer. GEMS! They carried, or swallowed in some cases, their gemstones and crossed borders to personal and economic freedom.


Emeralds are the premier gems in the beryl family. For more than 4,000 years, emeralds have been among the most valuable of all jewels.


The world had to wait until Spain conquered the New World and found Indians wearing great emeralds to see how fine the green gemstones could be. Fabulous emerald crystals came from what is now Colombia. It took Spain five decades to overpower the Muzo Indians who occupied the mining area. Vast quantities were taken from South America during the Spanish conquest but the original mines have since been lost. The finest stones come from Colombia, where they are mined from the calcite veining bituminous limestone at Muzo, Chivor, Coscuez, and Somondoco, Boyaca; these deposits were discovered in the late 1500's.

 

MINING

There are in Colombia, two main sources of emeralds. The Muzo and the Chivor Mines. Muzo, 105 Km north of the Capital city of Bogotá, D.C., with an area close to 360 Km2, is located 600 meters (1800 feet) above sea level. The mine embraces the Itoco River a tributary to the Minero River. Worth mentioning in the Muzo area are the mines of Tequendama, Santa Barbara, El Cholo, Coscuez, and Peñas Blancas. This mining district is controlled by the Colombian Government and exploited private companies through term contracts.

Chivor, on the other hand, is located 165 Km. Northeast of Santafé de Bogotá, D.C., in territory of the municipality of Almeida, in Boyacá. The mine oversees the confluence of rivers Lengupa and Rucio, which together become the Guavio River. It is located 1800 Mts. (5400 ft) above sea level, and holds two main mining centers: Buenavista, with Las Vegas and San Juan, 8 Km away from each other, and Gachala. Chivor and Muzo areas are operated through concession by the government.

The Muzo and the Chivor Mines. Muzo, 105 Km north of the Capital city of Bogotá, D.C., with an area close to 360 Km2, is located 600 meters (1800 feet) above sea level. The mine embraces the Itoco River a tributary to the Minero River. Worth mentioning in the Muzo area are the mines of Tequendama, Santa Barbara, El Cholo, Coscuez, and Peñas Blancas.

 

 

TREATMENT

The color of Emeralds ranges from bluish-green to a shade of yellowish green. The presence of chrome + iron renders the yellow-green color and the chromium + vanadium gives the bluish green color. The Emerald is the only stone of the Bérylses family to be classified in the precious stone family.

Emerald is a member of the beryl family of minerals. Other gemstones in this family include Aquamarine, Bixbite, Golden Beryl, Goshenite and Morganite. The most prized color for Emerald is a deep, vibrant, rich green. Inclusions are extremely common among Emeralds.

These are an important way to mark the distinction between natural and synthetic stones. We do not sell synthetic Emeralds. Treatment: Almost all Emeralds have some inclusions. The visibility of fractures can be reduced by filling them with oils and resins. Both of these methods are accepted practice and do not in any way diminish the value of the stone. Care: Emeralds are very delicate stones.

 

 

 

 

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